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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 58
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in syria. 40,000 people dead. almost two years into a civil war. no real end in sight. the obama administration has a clear policy of avoiding intervention. what do you think should be done more in syria? >> syria is a complex issue. i was the author of the syrian accountability act, which passed both houses of congress and signed by president bush in 2004, slapping sanctions on syria for the first time ever. we knew in 1979 that syria was an aider and abetter of the assad regime. it put sanctions on syria for doing all these horrendous things, including supporting terrorism, for occupying lebanon, and other things. assad is a bad guy. his father was a bad guy. the assad dictatorship has ruled for 40 years. the have been ruthless in their power. they are iran's main ally in the region. i think it would be a blow to iran if the regime were to fall. we are very cautious. we do not want to get involved in any more wars. think it is enough. i do think there are a lot of things we could be and should be doing to help the opposition and syria. >> such as? >> we are finally recognizing
to the syrians after the fall of the regime, because syria is not like libya. libya, at least the had resources, their own resources sources. syria has nothing except human beings. syria, the capital is one of the old as capitals in the world. this is why if syria -- they need international support. the only way to invest in syria in the future, by building strong internationally. build a strong the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen
at recent developments on the ground in syria. host: thanks for being with us. have we turned a corner with regards to the situation in syria? caller: it seems to me it is an important juncture, perhaps a crossroads. turning a corner might be going a bit far. president assad still has substantial military capabilities, quite a bit of support. he still has control of the capital. it is a little bit hard to say. clearly the risk and an upswing on the rebel side. -- there has been an upswing on the rebel side. i think there is momentum in favor of the rebels, but this still seems to be a conflict that can go on for a long time. host: if the regime fails, it president assad is forced out, who takes his place? caller: i think that is a major concern on all fronts. there is a great fear there could be anarchy and chaos. people in syria are well aware of what happened in neighboring iraq. there is a large number of people who are not necessarily tied to the government but are extremely frightened that there could be a bloodletting that was seen in neighboring iraq. host: your in beirut. you a
in relation to syria. other let's look at the guests and topics making up the rest of the sunday programs. >> good morning. on today's network tv talk shows, the topics include the so-called fiscal cliff and the negotiations between the white house and congress and the situation in the middle east. you could hear all the shows on cspan radio beginning at noon eastern. first is meet the press with senator dick durbin and kevin mccarthy. at 1:00 p.m., pierre abc's of this week with republican senator tom coburn and democratic senator debbie stabenow. the chair like to the house financial services committee, jeb hensarling and congressional progress of caucus co-chair. at 2:00 p.m. is fox news sunday with chris wallace and chuck schumer. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cor
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
the potential for further unrest in syria, and egypt and across the middle east, it seems to me that that's a question that is really critical as we look at how we continue to provide protection for our personnel on the ground. >> well, senator, first with regard to the specific issue of benghazi. it was addressed in the report. the arb's judgment, there was not enough time to have use military force to respond to make a difference in that situation. but you raise a very good broader question and service on we will be working to with our colleagues and the pentagon and elsewhere in the administration. >> thank you and again the potential for unrest across the middle east i would hope that we would follow up on the specific question because it seems to me critical as we look at the situation going forward. and i will just conclude by adding my personal thanks and appreciation to senator lugar. it has truly been an honor to serve with you, angeli the tremendous legacy for this committee and for the country. thank you. >> senator shaheen, thank you. let me just say that i've thought a lot ab
and 18s, which are two of the highest mobile air defenses that have sold to syria and enter the past. i know that remains. the mi25 helicopters were forced to turn it around. it is a big deal. the regime really needed more mi-25's. they did not have enough. i have not seen that an interlock time. i do not even know if they have one left operational. that is definitely an issue. as far as the current report about the number of vessels heading toward syria, my of the cost guess is they're getting ready for an operation and enter syria. there are a lot of russian >> pats of interest. that they need to get them out. -- >> pats in circassia. -- expats in syria. as far as the day today -- fuel is difficult. have not figure that out yet. most of these supplies are coming and three flights through iran. the rebels shutdown damascus international, that is okay. the syrians have a lot of their bases they can use. it is a requirement for a run to continued to back assad. the second question, this is an extremely complicated question that i am in the process of writing a longer report on. what i wi
. since 1962, the state has been highly centralized. the state to maintain control of everything in syria even if you permit to apply for a open a store. you have to check first with security forces. people in syria have to do this very well with almost no funding or very little funding. they also have to operate in abnormal circumstances. there is aleppo the city and also the periphery. they make up the province. all of the periphery has been liberated. when i was in aleppo i missed the hustle and bustle of the city. the first thing i did their was i was hosted by the revolutionary transition. they come together into what they can to fill this void. we took a tour of the city. most of the shops where closed down. some were not. i wanted to find out that was trying to function as a transitional government structure. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they
in syria. it is called "national gripe." ""grape." this magazine is in arabic and in english. every week, they come up with what is going on the ground. and they come from the analytic pieces from the analysts inside the country. this magazine did an important story. it gives us a sense about the rising of the citizen- journalist. this is why, when we got the news today about the death of mohammad, it was a tragedy to the whole town, and all our civilians. it is hard to lose such an important as activists. this is the same news we got yesterday. i lost four of my persons, three of them are children, in my extended family, for one of the missiles and fighter jets that left members of my family killed -- five years old, three years old, and one year old, and their grandfather. this unfortunately became every day news we got, with the use of the regime of the air force and fighter jets. in all the cases, when in the regime -- the use of the air force will increase the number of casualties will be killed every day. this is what happened. yesterday, as example, 159 has been killed. according
and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle east, iran's nuclear weapons program, and the absence of an effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. these are questions and many others that we will have a chance to discuss this weekend. like me, you, i'd just can now wait to get started then that we have a very special guest tonight to get us started. i am very grateful to him for joining us tonight. we have tried for many years to have him join us at the forum. some of you misremember he was here five years ago before he became the foreign minister. since then, we have not had the pleasure for one reason or another. i am grateful that he is going to start us off today than the y today. the leader of th he is now the number two leader of the party and now the foreign minister in the current government of israel. to interview him tonight and to conduct conversations with him before we have a chance to ask him some questions, we are very grateful to robert sieg
syria, secretary panetta said later. he said he invited kim jong-un for dinner, he served him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then president clinton's director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forward to the opportunity to go back and pick walnuts back in california. told this story before b
undergoing difficult transitions. another example is syria. buckeye that and iraq six to establish there are working to hijack to suit their own extremist needs. last week we designated as an alias of aqi, already listed as a foreign terrorist organization. as they try to wrap themselves in the legitimacy of the -- to add to this list of challenges and to west africa, the factions continue to carry out attacks in nigeria and win recruits and public sympathy. the number and sophistication of the attacks has increased while the group focuses principally on local ledger in issues, there are reports it is developing financial links other extremists. i need to make something of a detour. while no state actors like al qaeda remain at the top of the list, we have seen a resurgence of state sponsorship terrorism, especially in activities of the iranian regime. with the iranian revolutionary guard corps. in addition to the critical support hezbollah as providing for the assad regime, over the past year, there has been iranian-backed terrorism. hezbollah activity has reached levels unseen si
. it is a good question. i think the syrians situation is different from the iraq situation. syria reminds me more of the balkans in the 1990's. the internal conflict is horrendous. i think it is different in this respect. not even the syrians want the united states to invade and takeover syria and administrate it. that is not the issue in the case of syria. the issue is whether the united states should supply weapons to factions fighting the regime that are aligned with our interests, and if we do not do this, will the more extreme elements support the radical islamic rebels fighting assad? we want the people to prevail better closer to our interests, yet we are not supporting the materially. reports from serious say there is resentment on this. al qaeda in iraq is now heavily involved in the syrian conflict. one reason is able to do that is we took all our forces out of iraq in 2011. if we had to several thousand forces working with iraqi special operation forces, i believe we could have attenuated the growth of applied it -- of al qaeda in syria. this is a result of the removal of all forc
in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
for a similar instance to happen if and when assad falls in syria? >> it depends on whether we assist or not. the syrian people are not only fighting against assad, but are angry against the united states. people talk about how the syrian people do not understand why we'll will not help them, and they are anchored and embittered. that will dictate a lot of their attitude and our involvement with syria after assad goes. that will be dictated what happens in syria whether they believe we have been of assistance to them or not pick in libya, but they believe we assisted them or showed that appreciation. meanwhile, we took a hike with a light footprint and let all these things develop. i think it depends if we ever have the moral courage, which we are clearly lacking, and assisting the syrian people throw off the yoke of this brutal dictator. we hear again there are now cluster bombs being used. scud missiles. i ask the question that i asked secretary panetta well over a year ago, when about 7000 had been killed -- how many have to die before we're willing to intervene? how many have to die befo
the role of lobbyists. and an update on the situation in syria. that is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> this week on "newsmakers," gov. peter shulim discusses the fiscal cliff and its impact. that is a 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge. but we have not coordinated care and all of these services have so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful
" says this about the situation in syria -- it is the front page of "the new york times" this morning, and they say this -- peter baker and bryan gordon write in "the new york times" -- then, also we are doing a segment on syria taking a deeper dive into this issue on sunday here on the "washington journal ." moving on to the situation in israel. five nations some men envoys of israel. also, some other headlines for you. "the baltimore sun" -- next to that, president obama suggests a revamp of the russia nuke deal. in "of the wall street journal" -- a "new york times" headline -- much about the phone call which occurred some months ago remains shrouded in mystery. it highlights the level of his anxiety about the current crop of candidates. we are talking about the proposal by house republicans to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff put out yesterday from the speaker's office with signatures from the rest of the leadership team. christine, a democratic caller, what do you think about it? you are on the air. caller: i have to agree with a couple of other people that called in. we have had
that passes off -- pisses off syria, secretary panetta said later. he said if he invited kim jong he servedinner, jh him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then'pressing s director of the office of management and budget -- then president clinton' director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forwa
: if there is further military action in syria, does that have any impact? guest: the pentagon would need funding for those things. when libya came up, the pentagon does what it is told to do and goes and fights and goes back to congress and says, "now you need to make us whole." in iraq, there were supplemental appropriations. the pentagon will do what it needs to do. it will go back to congress and say, now we need the money to make up for things we spend money on the war. host: this comes from twitter. guest: that is a tough question. i do not know. once you get up to major, lieutenant colonel, you are getting close to that number. they indoor tremendous hardships and often cannot buy a home because they are a mother around so much. there are a lot of sacrifices that goes on. host: scott in woodbridge, virginia. caller: good morning. i am a former marine and a military brat. my father retired from the navy. i have a long history of active duty. i think there is misinformation going on this morning. talk about $800 billion for the wars in the middle east. we spent double that on the stimulus pl
of russian policy toward syria? since we mentioned iran, can we get as far away as syria? >> you can get as far away as syria hopefully with some connection to the i.n.f. the question of syria is of totally sufficient importance that we could address that. thank you for the question. my own gut feeling -- i don't know what you guys think -- the russians have been for the last several weeks, there have been indications of unhappiness with what is going on in syria without a clear sense of what it is that they can contribute and whether they could do it on their own or with the u.s. the u.s. has always wanted the russians to be part of that kind of a solution if there be one at all. so, if the russians in any way are moving toward the american position with respect to sir why, i think we are better off for it. if anyone with like to answer that, please do. no? ok, another question out here? >> there is one right up here. then we'll assume that is the last question. >> i wonder if you all hinted or alluded to it, i wonder if you recall the public diplomacy dimension of the movement toward i
to syria. we see iran brutalizing their own people. so a nuclear iran is not simply a threat to israel. it is a threat to all nations and risks opening the floodgates on nuclear proliferation around the world. when it comes to iran's nuclear threat, the united states does not have a policy of containment. we have a policy of prevention, built on the dual tracks of pressure and engagement, while keeping all options on the table. the united states is ratcheting up the pressure to sharpen the choices facing iran's leadership. we've had our own sanctions in place for many years. but we never had a coalition like the one we have built over the last four years. we convinced all 27 nations of the european union to stop importing iranian oil and all 20 major global importers of iranian oil -- including japan, india, china, and turkey -- to make significant cuts. iran today exports more than one million fewer barrels of crude each day than it did just last year. iran's currency is worth less than half of what it was last november. the pressure is real and it is growing. and let me add, we take
. revolution is going. syria is teetering, jordan is burning and the future is yet to be written. the question, will there be elections, will islamists win, will it be one man one vote or one man, one vote, one time. with that, we are going to debate the motion, if democracy is going to triumph are victories at the ballot box unavoidable. we will have opening remarks from our panelists. from there, we will have some question and answers from myself and the audience and our panelists will be allowed two minutes at the end to restate their case and potentially persuade you to believe in what they believe. we'll start with reuel. you may begin. >> this is at such an angle, i don't think i can drink. >> i'm confident you will find a way to drink. >> i want to thank everyone for coming and particularly i want to thank my co-panelists here. rob and i have been debating this issue for almost a decade. certainly with bret, i don't think i ever disagreed with him except on this issue and i particularly have to thank my debating colleague, brian katulis from the center of american progress. it shows the
, your calls and comments on "washington journal." than a discussion on the future of syria. a forum of the impact of the latino population in future elections. >> i wanted to explain how this totalitarianism happens. we do know the story of the cold war. we know the documents. we have seen the archives that describe relationships between stalin, church hill, and truman. we know the events from our point of view. i wanted to show from a different angle from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people who work subjected to this system. how did people make choices and how did they react in the cave? one of the things that has happened since 1999 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become differentiated. these countries no longer have much of in common with each other. >> from the end of world war ii through 1956. from "iron curtain" on c-span a &a. >> how states are bracing for sequestration. the schedule for january affecting many agencies and
in syria or from any militia group loyal to the syrian government and that the captors were talking openly about their loyalty to the government. he said his captors executed at least one of this rebel escorts on the spot at the time they were taken. they were freed yesterday. the center for american progress is naming lawrence summers as a distinguished senior fellow. he will work with the economic policy team. he took office as the 27 president of harvard university. he is director of a center for business and government. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> i did not conduct a survey of gun owners. i found that very often the reaction -- your way of thinking before and after you have a gun is very different. any law-abiding gun owner realizes when he has a gun that is a huge responsibility. if use this weapon wrongly, you can dig yourself into legal trouble and cause unnecessary misery and death even to people .ou didn't intend to do harm to it makes you very careful. it would make people more careful if that all had to pass some kind of a test before
on the situation in syria. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c- span. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 63, i believe and they are going to say that is president. and indiana -- >> we are talking about facts. when they decided the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish it. they did not say all the states -- >> correct. they talked about indiana. let me finish peeping >> you are misrepresenting. >> no, i am not. >> i hear these accusations that black people, a voter i.d. lost disproportionately affect minorities. it implies to me that we have something missing in our brains. to me, if white americans can get it to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not able to? they are lesser the man? that is what bothers me about the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. there has to be a specialness when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we really need to make concessions for them because they can follow the rules like everybody else. when you tre
on the situation in syria. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. on c-span. >> by a majority of 6 to 3 and they are going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. they did not say that all of those states who have subsequently done that -- >> let me finish because you misrepresent what i said. >> hold on. >> that's the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities, it implies to me we have something missing in our brain. to me if white can get i.d.'s to vote and follow the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that they are not good enough, that they are lesser than and that bothers me from democrats on the left that we always have to make special -- there has to be a specialness when we deal with minorities because they are too feebleminded. we need to make concessions for them because they can't follow the rules like everybody else. and when you treat people like victims, then i don't think th
the "times" has in places like iran or iraq or syria, pakistan, afghanistan -- they have imbedded people who speak the tribal languages. they have safe houses. they have translators. they have armored cars in some cases, bodyguards. even when they send people into a place like syria, their own medical personnel. did they are really the only paper that does for news at that level. the "washington post" has often had a very polite idea that all they have to do for foreign news is interview the ambassadors in washington and go to the un . they will do the washington news -- the beltway. but they do not do for news. they are probably historical the second best paper in this country. the "times" has an enormous investment in foreign news. if they survive, ultimately, the people who use their foreign news will have to pay for it. i did see -- i want to say something, cnn had some people in syria. that was the most impressive for news i have seen outside of "the new york times" in a very long time. they had somebody who was in syria, and that was impressive. it is still not what we're talking about
aggressive or the stance of an aggressive china. kerry has to look at the civil war in syria and figure out how to contain the damage. if the military loses control over chemical weapons, there could be greater refugee problems and could destabilize jordan and lebanon and to spillover potentially into israel. that will be the first thing. that is much more of a job for a diplomat to ease tensions and to get people to not respond to provocations that the defense secretary. host: first question is gil rahm westchester, new york. caller: i like to know your opinion on mr. kerry's nomination for secretary of state after he called our soldiers killers and murderers and rapists. guest:well, he has been a politician for a very long time and i think over the years he has said and some thisome thing. i am sure in 2004 he regretted some of his affiliations. kerry was never as radical as some of the other members, but he has been in the public eye for more than 40 years and has a very long track record. recently, he was someone known in washington for giving third, fourth, 6, and seven chances to bash
. they'll be discussing the war in syria and tensions in iran later today and look at the arab spring and nonproliferation risks and remarks from senators. that gets under way at 1:30. president obama and the first family will participate this evening in the annual lighting of the national christmas tree. actor neil patrick harris will m.c. the ceremony which will include performances from james taylor and the musical group the frey. that's live here on c-span beginning at 4:30 eastern. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's elvis grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the dropping of the bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. and i don't want to argue -- [inaudible] with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living. and to do what i can so to see that this doesn't happen again. >> cliffton truman daniel will join us in washington to discuss. sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the u.s. house has completed its
going on in washington. later, a look at developments in syria and the response from the international community. "washington journal" here on c- span. this week, we will have the vermont governor and new chairman of the democratic governors' association, who will talk about the fiscal cliff and laying the groundwork for the 2013 and 2014 elections. lives on sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern. next, a quick look at president obama and the first family last week at the national christmas tree lighting ceremony. ♪ [applause] >> merry christmas, everybody! >> it is great to see you all. happy holidays. happy holidays, mr. president. >> is it time? i think it's time. i hope everybody is ready. we have to do the countdown. starting with five. 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. [cheers] ♪ >> merry christmas, everybody. ♪ >> please welcome the director of washington and st. john's church. >> let us about our heads in prayer. let us prey. gracious god who has blessed us with this good land for our heritage, we humbly pray that we may always prove ourselves to be a people mindful of your favre and glad to do your
and douglas holtx-eakin. an update on the situation in syria. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3, and they will say, that is president. india -- indiana voter id. >> they will decide the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish. they did not say that all of those states -- >> they talked about indiana. let me finish. you are rupert -- you're misrepresenting what i am saying. the supreme court is a lot of the land. >> when i hear these accusations of black people, boehner i.t. loss -- voter id laws, disproportionately affected minorities, it seems that we are <. today, the white americans can get ids to vote, and go through all the prophecies -- processes, what are you telling black people? that is what bothers me about a lot -- about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats, that we have to make special -- there has to be a specialness when we deal with minorities because they're too feeble- minded. we need to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules
in liberating libya. we are now thinking about deploying defense missiles on the turkish border with syria. we're putting forces into the western pacific because of north korea, they may launch a missile as a test object. we have china, which could have a defense establishment on budgetary terms larger than our own with capabilities that we may not be able to match. we are the only one that is "x," but that may not be enough. host: right-wing radical on twitter says, we agree to bring the troops home and spending money here. leave the world be. republican caller. caller: i agree with right-wing radical. bring the troops home. i specifically wanted to ask about the militarization of our police department and our sheriffs departments. i am calling from fredericksburg, virginia. we have a swat teams that are running drones. what about homeland security and all this apparatus we are using? isn't that just switching from the cost of the military to homeland security, which president bush did not want? how was the war financed? i know that george bush did not credit on the baseline pentagon budget,
future and research development and innovation balm depends on .hat we do syria we are very mindful of the fact that we have very little money. with the help of experts we can at least lay out what we consider the vision for our country's research and innovation. and then allow the administration to determine what we can cannot do. currently there is so much frustration as soon where nasa is concerned that they do not know what is coming next. just looking at what has happened so far in space, where we are now keen almost exclusively from space exploration and research. i believe that to stop in decide we cannot afford it is saying to our future that we will not be there. we are just going to take a back seat and watch the rest of the world. we will not need to educate our young people i guess my question is how would you help us. -- how would you help us come to a real of recommendation that speaks to be need or future rather than just the money? we have got to make some real serious decisions. we have got to decide that we're going to invest in our future and eliminate the need fo
. that is not for news. -- foreign news. "the times" is in places like iraq, syria, pakistan, afghanistan. they have embedded people that have knowledge of languages, they have saved houses, translators, armored cars in some cases, bodyguards, and even when they send people into a place like syria, their own medical personnel. they are really the only paper that does for news at that level, or close. "the washington post" has often had this polite idea that all they have to do for for news is it to the ambassadors in washington or go to the u.n. they are going to do the washington news, right? the beltway. but they do not do for news, and they are historic we probably the second best paper in the country. one of the ways, if they survive, ultimately, the people who steal their foreign news will have to pay for it. none of the major networks are doing foreign news at this level. although, i did want to say something to be fair. last night, cnn had people in syria. that was the most impressive thing that i have seen outside of "the new york times" in a very long time. they had somebody in the north of
of a mutual effort to address the threats of hezbollah patrons iran and syria. by simply designating hezbollah as a terrorist organization and stating the obvious, the europeans could deprive hezbollah to access to millions of dollars in european banks and other financial institutions while making an enormous contribution to regional stability, saving hundreds of lives that would otherwise be hezbollah's future victims. again, i strongly support this kelly resolution and i urge all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves. the gentleman from new york, mr. engel is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 834 and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he wishes to consume. mr. engel: thank you. this urges the members of -- the nations of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impose sanctions on it. we know from our experiences with iran that sanctio
a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a pla
, democratic future for syria. these are in line with what we and our international partners would result from the formation of the commission last month. as we look at ongoing efforts to support the syrian people, let me be clear 24e678 united states stands with the syrian people in insist that can any transition process result in a peaceful, unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are protected and a future of this kind cannot inlewd al-assad. >> [inaudible] >> that's correct. we provide significant assistance to the syrian people, we proside significant, not lethal, assistance to the opposition. but our position on providing lethal aid has not changed. >> to foe low up -- >> i've got folks in the back. >> defense secretary suggested the syrian government has preparations of chemical weapons and the administration is not as concerned about this as they were last week, is that accurate? and what has changed? >> i'm not going to get into assessments beyond what secretary of defense pa net -- panetta said. i would simply reiterate our clear warning to the assaad regime about the potenti
syria's deputy foreign minister also visited the regimes of venezuela, cuba, knick rag washington and ecuador -- nicaragua and ecuador. assad, a close ally of the iranian regime, and an enabler for their hezbollah branch, may be seeking political asylum in one of these countries as the situation in syria continues to rapidly deteriorate. mr. speaker, we cannot allow these violent actors a safe haven to conduct their evil schemes and the presence of these individuals only reaffirms the significant threat posed by iran and its proxies to the united states and to the hemisphere. h.r. 3783 requires that the secretary of state outline a u.s. governmentwide strategy to combat the aggressive actions of iran and its proxies such as hezbollah in the western hemisphere toward a comprehensive policy stance that protects the security interests of the united states. we must do everything we can to isolate iran and its proxies from sources of financial assistance in the hemisphere as well as prevent entities from possibly helping iran to evade sanctions. we must ensure that the u.s. is actively
with humanitarian aid, and working for a transition to a syria that is free of the regime. today, i want to make it absolutely clear to assad the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is an would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. [applause] we simply cannot allow the 26 -- the 21st century to the darkened by the weapons of the 20th century. over the last four years, we make critical investments in our production programs. energy, state, and we have been increasing funding and sustaining it. even as we make some very tough fiscal choices, we will keep investing in these programs. our national security depends on it. after all, even with all of your success, the thousands of missiles destroyed, bombers and submarines eliminated, the warheads deactivated, we are nowhere near done. by a long shot. you all know this. there is still much too much material. being stored without enough protection. there are still terrorists and criminal gangs doing everything they can to get their hands on
negotiations by clients in washington. our guest is anna palmer. and later a discussion on syria and the response from the international community. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. this week on news makers, the vermont governor and chair of the democratic governors' association peter shumlin. he talks about the fiscal cliff and laying the groundwork for the 2013-2014 election. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> in president obama's weekly address, he talks about tax policy, the tax cuts put in place by the previous administration that will expire at the end of the year. then the republican address on the economy, jobs, and education policy. >> hello, everybody. over the last few weeks, there's been a lot of talk about deadlines we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. but with so much noise and so many opinions flying around, it can be easy to lose sight of what this debate is really about. it's not about which political party comes out on top, or who wins or loses in washington. it's about making smart decisions that will have a real impact on your lives
is the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan and bahrain and syria. the agenda has remained narrow as a means of focusing the issue of our principal concern, namely proliferation. the second school of thought suggests the agenda is broader and perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the debt -- disagreements of the nuclear issue. as far as i can tell, that has never been resolved. when an issue remains not result, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of the bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we always talk about the year of this or the year of that. we always think of it as not having enough time. yet there is always more this issue seems a degree of time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before. i suspect there is a bilateral conversation that it will attend the discussion. said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty about what we hope to achieve. i would be interested to hear what yo
from libya to syria. anothere going to have mass because the administration is not honest with the american people. this man has been lying to us, and pour misses rice is the one who will suffer for it. if a americans will open their eyes and do a little research, they will see that when everything is said and done and the truth comes out, the orders were all coming from the white house. president obama and she was the one that was thrown under the boss, just like he has done with everybody else in his life. you are good for a little bit, and once you are not i will throw you out. host: thank you for the call. from "usa today." a statement from john kerry. this is eric from decatur, georgia. caller: good morning. the lady that just spoke, i believe she is totally wrong. i think this thing is about the color of the president and the color of somebody you want appointed to a high position. these republicans cannot deal with the fact this country is moving forward. to disregard the middle class and the poor. host: let me go back to scott wilson who has a side bar story on "th
when events in iran, syria, no. -- syria, and others will test american security in extreme ways. i commend each of you, my senate colleagues, for the commitment that allow you to stand for election to the united states senate to begin with. running for office is a difficult endeavor, usually accompanied by great personal risk and cost. each one of you is capable of being a positive force for changing the tone of debate in our country. each one of you has the responsibility to protect the integrity and represent your constituents, but also to make informed and imaginative choices on which our country depends. i am optimistic about our country's future. i believe that both internal divisions and external threats can be overcome. the united states will continue to serve as the inspiration for people seeking peace, freedom, and economic prosperity. and the united states senate should and will be at the forefront of this advancement. may we see each day, got our creator -- each day from god, our creator -- and may god continue to bless the united states of america. >> the gentleman from
afghanistan, to syria to iran to north carolina we also must recognize -- north korea we also must recognize the regimes that threaten the united states and allies. therefore we must ensure our military is sufficiently resourced and that our national leaders priretize our resources towards efforts that are appropriate for the u.s. military and our national vite al security interests. i look forward to learning more toobt situation on the ground as well as what the u.s. government is doing to address the situation in the drc. mr. smith. >> thank you, mr. president. i thank you very u much for holding this hearing. this is a very important issue. as you described the situation in the eastern drc is dire. it's the largest humanitarian crisis that too few people have herd of. in some estimation over the course of the last 15 to 20 years now nearly 5 million people have been killed many more wounded injured raped displaced. it is a place where a lot of people are suffering. and it is a place where i believe we can make a difference in helping to reduce that suffering. stability in the region is i
the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan or by iran or syria. they say the agenda has to remain narrow as a means of focusing issue on our principal concern which is proliferation. the second school of thought suggests if the agenda is broader, perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the agreements on the nuclear issue. that particular concept has never been resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered as a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we talk about years of decision. i think we have more time on this issue. we always think of the issue as not having enough time and being urgent but somehow there is always more time. in 2008, this issue was important and it had an urgency but it has time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before also in 2009. if there is a bilateral discussion [inaudible] >> marina, ray said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty a
want to start off with 9/11, syria, china and the 20 children. three examples, 9/11, syria, people assassinated. i need to understand why you diminished someone's comments with regard to the second amendment and the purpose of that. you have a master's degree. i don't understand. that said rather than being critical. the reality is horrible situation that happened. i don't defend anything that happened at the school, but that said, the individual going into a school with a shotgun, that said we could come back to the 1994 democratic vote. senator feinstein introduced the bill and you guys lost although h lost. i'll stop right there. those are three examples and i invite the listeners to look at the china situation in less than a week ago where ears, arms and fingers were cut off. what say you. guest: we do live in a society where we do feel protected and represented in government. i think that is something that maybe has diminished in the sense of the governments there. we do have a representative democracy and something we should be very, very proud of. and compare us to countries
real problems in the middle east if you look at syria, where the u.s. is at r.f.k. for being drawn into a serious conflict there with weapons? there's obviously real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this and take a look at it. did not say that we would shift everything we have in the military or in across our government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it also talked about an enduring reerment for us to be present and in a security role in the middle east as well. worry talking about a near-term perspective on this. yes, the middle east has issues and has historically had issues that will require -- obviously u.s. leadership, but also will require a certain level of military security over time. and we will have to balance that, as we look at the size and nature of our structure, and once we have the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced that we can do both in the long run. i'm convinced we're on a good slope in the
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